Write-up & Photos by Jacqueline Bennett newsandviewsjb.com

photo by Jacqueline Bennett Connecticut's  winding Hockanum River in winter shown on Feb. 9, 2015.

Photo by Jacqueline Bennett Connecticut’s winding Hockanum River in winter, shown on Feb. 9, 2015.

 

Whether or not snow in New England is actually ‘news’ is a question to be pondered. Reports of snow certainly dominate the local airwaves this time of year. Anchors are typically called in to work earlier than usual and the morning news shows go on anywhere from a half hour to a hour ahead of their time slots  – some at 4 a.m. – as meteorologists keep viewers informed almost minute by minute about the amount of snow on the ground and, or, falling from the air.

 

 

Television coverage has taken to calling the accumulations, “snow events”. And, weather reports have consumed so much of the broadcast news that it prompted a local newspaper editor to write a recent editorial espousing that filling the news with such reports is keeping viewers from being informed about other, critical issues.

Snowblowers are a common sight in the central Connecticut part of New England this time of year.

Snowblowers are a common sight in the central Connecticut part of New England this time of year.

 

In central Connecticut, folks are still digging out from yet another significant snowfall yesterday. That followed a major snowstorm last week which dropped 2-3 feet in various parts of the state and prompted the governor to close the roads overnight and into part of the next day. Today and tomorrow are expected to offer a reprieve.

A snow cleared path.

A snow cleared path.

 

 

But keep those shovels and ice melt handy. It’s winter, it’s New England, and more snow is expected on Thursday.